LiveRebel 2.0 is here.

Categories java, Mozilla, Open Technologies

We at ZeroTurnaround are releasing version 2.0 of LiveRebel today!

 

What is LiveRebel about, dude?

LiveRebel 2.0 is an out-of-the-box solution to end slow, inefficient production deployment processes that often happen at 3 AM by overworked operations staff.

With LiveRebel, now every single update is:

  • online
  • transactional
  • 100% reversible
  • fully automated
  • instantaneous in case of minor updates

What does this mean to you?

It means that when something does go wrong, as it inevitably does, there is a panic button to press that will make it all better.

It means that because your application stays online, your updates can be done during the day and businesses don’t have to hide from their customers or lose a cent of revenue.

LiveRebel 2.0 now supports multiple update strategies:

  1. Hotpatching strategy updates the application instance in-memory, without pausing for a moment.
  2. Rolling restart strategy takes each server down at a time for update, but the users don’t notice a thing as they are automatically routed to instance with their session.
  3. Offline update strategy will take all servers down and do a clean restart, the user requests will still resume when servers are up.

How to install it?

Nice walk-through is available here , but it’s simple. Just 3 steps:

  • Download the archive. It comes with 90 day evaluation license.
  •  Unzip it
  •  Run the command center

Here’s is a very short video, that shows the install process:

 

More info and screenshots?

Click on the image to see more.
screenshot

The future of Java – a community perspective

Categories Community Management, java

Ah memories

I’ve started my interaction with Java a long time ago – in 1998 (*), when a friend of mine show me thr good ‘ol Borland JBuilder and how to write Swing applications. I was using a very very old computer that I bought a day before that and my first compilation took 30 min or so.

Couple of months after that I betrayed Java and I’ve start using PHP and other easy to learn web languages, because my employer requires that, but I never forgot my loving Java.

14 years after

14 year after that I had the opportunity to be a part of Java community again. Of course I followed what’s going on with Java during the years and when the Oracle bought it I was shocked. They did the same with MySQL…

What is the future of Java NOW?

Last couple of months I am working with JUG and other Java boys and girls and I see that most of them are not happy, enthusiastic and don’t care about the spirit of Java (if I may use that expression).

I don’t want to start a technology flame war and I am not a Java tech person at all, but I am worried about the community around Java.

The Example
There are JUG’s with 1000 and more members, from which 50 are active online and 10 coming to an offline meeting.

Community?
Most of you can say Java is only about the technology and maybe they are right, but this is not what I think. Java is about the community also – There is no technology that can survive without a community around it and the community plays a big role to make a technology kick-ass.

That’s I want to find the way to scream “WAKE UP” and to push the technology forward.

So, where is the problem?
Is it Oracle politics about Java? Are you afraid of them?
Is it Community Management – most of the JUG lists are used as one way communication. There is no active engagement from the leaders at all. Sad!
Is it the “threat” of other languages? Really?

What do YOU think? How to bring back the passion?

I have my own vision, but I’d love to hear more about yours. Can you share it with me, please?

P.S I’d love to discuss this at FOSDEM and I may buy you a beer :)
(*) in my 1.0 version the date was wrong, sorry for that.

Open Source GeoServer now coding Java at light-speed using JRebel for free.

Categories java, Open Technologies

Quite a while ago we decided to give free JRebel licenses to valuable F(L)OSS projects.

GeoServer is one of them:

 

GeoServer is an open source software server written in Java that allows users to share and edit geospatial data. Designed for interoperability, it publishes data from any major spatial data source using open standards.

Being a community-driven project, GeoServer is developed, tested, and supported by a diverse group of individuals and organizations from around the world.

GeoServer is the reference implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service (WFS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS) standards, as well as a high performance certified compliant Web Map Service (WMS). GeoServer forms a core component of the Geospatial Web.

If you’re working in Java and you have redeploys, here’s a solution for you – Click here to download 1 month trial or see the features from here

How the Suits should assign tasks to Geeks

Categories java, Mozilla

Not unlike the great zebras and lions of the wild, the “Suits” (Marketing, Sales, Creative) and “Geeks” (Dev, Ops, Infra) in an IT company often face misunderstandings. When highly-technical and less-technical employees in a fast-growing tech shop like ZeroTurnaround need to accomplish something jointly, good communication is clearly necessary, but it’s not a one-sided thing.

There is a symbiotic relationship at play; the Suits are at least partly responsible for propagating the Geeks’ natural habitat so that we can all work together in peace and take home a salary. The Geeks make the product and tell the Suits why it’s good. The Suits then turn this into revenue and we all have jobs. Yay!

So how does it work in a distributed work environment, where most direct communication occurs over Skype? In a company where people are working in different offices in different continents, communication becomes naturally less efficient. While technology has been responsible for making a successful distributed work environment possible, I’m continually noticing that, like anti-virus software, solutions to communication struggles are always a few steps behind the next emerging challenges.

Read this true story here and feel free to add comments.

JRebel and OSGi: Use the right tool for the right job

Categories java, Mozilla, Open Technologies

Often when discussing OSGi at events, conferences or forums, we hear things like, “Yeah, I like JRebel but now we are using OSGi”, or “Does JRebel support OSGi”, or “Isn’t OSGi the same as JRebel?”. Sometimes it happens that people start comparing OSGi to JRebel, which is kind of like comparing a Ferrari to a Skyscaper; thus, this article is designed to a) explain the differences on a technical level what JRebel and OSGi do, b) outline some ideal use cases for OSGi and JRebel c) clear up any grey areas or misconceptions between the two technologies. So, let’s go!

What is JRebel and what is OSGi?

JRebel is an anything-Java plugin that speeds up JVM-based development (Java, Scala, Groovy) by reloading changes made in your workspace into a running JVM, without restarts or redeploys, maintaining the state of the application while you’re coding.
In plain speech: When developers use JRebel, they see their code changes instantly without restarting anything, keeping their flow and maintaining state; JRebel supports various IDEs, app servers and over 40 Java frameworks.
OSGi is a module system and a dynamic runtime where modules (also called bundles) can come and go, but your code has to conform to the requirements of the module system — it is perhaps the only widely used framework for the JVM that enforces real modularity.
In plain speech: OSGi projects are inherently more modular than plain Java projects, as long as you follow the rules — for example, to use classes from another module, that module needs to declare that it exports the packages containing those classes.
Bottom line: JRebel is a productivity enhancer for anything Java, while OSGi is at its core a rather strict module system.

Read more…