How I run Ideation workshop to hear “the voice” of the team.

I missed a step in my previous article on purpose. I was planning to write a separate article about that and here it is.

When I was completing my UX training by Chris Nodder I liked a technique called “Ideation” and I have decided to hack it and to use it for my own purposes – as a product person.

So here’s what I did:

Booked a room:

I booked a meeting room for 2 hours. There is no special requirement for the room – you just need a table, a few chairs and a projector. You can also do it in a quiet working space with no cubicles or in a non-smoking bar.

Provided some sweets:

I’ve bought some sweets, to help people concentrate on the topic while doing something with their brains, their hands and their jaws. Later I realized that it would have been nicer if I had brought fresh fruits or something more healthier (I’ve red that in a book called (Design)“Sprint” written by a couple of Google Venture folks).

Provided the tools:

I bought colored pencils and I printed out lots of templates to be used during the workshop.

The template

Ran the workshop:

So, yes, the workshop – the idea was to get different people together working on a task to get some ideas and fresh views.

I invited people from different teams – I got a couple of QA guys, a few of Business Analysts and a bunch of programmers.

Then I randomly divided them in teams. And I gave them the task – a short list of user requirements with the question: How would you do this? Use your imagination and the template to create a simple prototype for just 15 minutes.

There were a few basic rules:

  • The requirements must be always visible on the screen
  • You can ask me questions if you have any (I was the customer)
  • Don’t talk, just prototype and eat sweets.

After this 15 min period, every team had 2 min to present their work in front of the others. There was no opportunity to ask questions during or after the process.
Here are some of the results:
A few ideas A few more ideas more ideas

and even more ideas

As you can see – you can do whatever you want, but you have to be able to explain it after that to the rest of the team and to focus on how it fits the customer requirements.

Anyone can prototype!

We repeated this with a few more requirements and at the end we had a lot of ideas to discuss with the rest of the team.

The outcome:

The goal of this workshop was to hear “the voice” of the whole team. Some guys are shy (mostly the developers, oops) and can’t share their ideas while we are discussing in a meeting.

The output was to generate ideas and to show great approaches on how we can solve a customer pain point.

How to measure customers’ satisfaction without asking them those boring questions

Let’s imagine you want to understand how happy your customers are with your product. According to the marketers there are several methods to do that, like NPS or Temper, but all of them require interaction with the customer.

Let’s be honest, most of the time people don’t want to answer stupid questions like “How do you feel about our new interface” and “Do you like our new red color?” and let’s be honest again and confess that no more than 10% of the users will answer those questions.

Of course you can use the data to create a magnificent dashboard and to convince the  management that your product rocks, but they can ask you some hard questions. “Then why are we losing money?” and “Why the Churn rate is so strange?” are just a couple of examples.

You don’t know.

Let’s take a step back and see what is important in this case. Let’s imagine we have a website where you offer content (video lessons, for example) and you are billing month by month.

 

Define your Groups and their Happiness KPIs

 

Let’s imagine that you have 2 main user groups (2 personas):

First Group – Constant Learners

Group of people interested in constant learning but not sure what they want to learn about (first).  These people will browse your content until they find something interesting and will spend time doing it.

What drives them?

  • They want to discover new topics.
  • They want to know a lot about everything.
  • They are interested in trending topics (no one will browse – How to create a chart in Excel)
  • They are thirsty about new knowledge.

Happiness KPIs (some of them):

  • Number of topics discovered
    • Minutes spent on each topic
  • Questions asked (onsite, outside)
  • Number of logins
  • Number of login patterns (do they log in every week or everyday at noon)
  • Number of points/certificates achieved (if you have such things)
  • Account lifetime

Second Group – Focused Learners

Group of people that are coming to your website to learn something specific – like python, because they need some tricks in their current work. They will find what they need and they will stick to it.

What drives them?

  • They want to learn something on a specific topic
  • They want something meaningful out of the topic fast
  • They want hands-on experience.

Happiness KPIs (some of them):

  • Finished % of  a topic.
  • Exercises completed (if any).
  • Questions asked.
  • Number of Video pauses (try to watch and code at the same time).

 

Ok. What’s next.

It’s obvious –

  • Define your own KPIs – you can use those above as an example.
  • Then try to put a “label” to any a small group of users. Is this user a [focused] learner or a [constant] learner. In the case above, get all users that have browsed more than 3 topics in the past month and assign them into the “constant” bucket and for the “focused” one, get all that have completed only 1 topic within the last month and have asked at least one question.
  • Track them to prove your claim – see if their behavior will remain the same – if it doesn’t – modify it.
  • The create a simple dashboard to visualize the data for the two groups – and create a marketing strategy around that – how to engage both groups and push them gently on the success path.

This is how you can measure customer happiness without asking your visitors boring questions and to give them the opportunity to lie, because most probably at the end of the month you will see most of your “We like this new red button”- type of users leaving your service forever.

 

Invison, please fix it

I visited today invision blog to learn about how to use some of their features and 3 seconds after I hit “play” on the video tutorial I got this, hovering everything, including the video I am interested in:

invision

Please fix it!

I understand the reason behind it,  but please can you hide it on the video pages? I am there to watch the video and to learn something new.

 

P.S The feedback was immediate :) Kudos!